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[Designated as Kanazawa City Preservation Architecture]

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Kaikaro is located in the centre of the main street of the Higashi Chayagai District with the rows of “chaya” or beautiful wooden houses. Chaya are traditional places for exclusive parties, where geisha have been entertaining guests by performing songs and dances since the Edo period. Being built in 1820, this well-preserved chaya district has been designated as Japan’s Important Preservation District. At dusk the chaya come alight, and the sounds of shamisen begin to be faintly heard.

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With over 190 years of history, Kaikaro is the largest chaya in the Higashi Chayagai District, being registered on city’s historical buildings.
You can see fine examples of classical chaya architecture such as kimusuko, large, barred panels that let in the sun but prevent outsiders from looking into the building.
The rows of two-story houses can only be seen in these chaya districts, since such constructions were a rare privilege for the nobility during the Edo period.

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Received a good review from Michelin travel guide, Kaikaro offers tourists a rare chance to see traditional chaya’s exquisite interior. Enter through the wooden slide door and the vermilion-lacquered stairs strike the eye. Ozashiki banquet rooms are positioned on the second floor, containing lustrous red walls. You’ll also find bold fusuma-e paintings, “nightingale floor” or chirping floorboards, an impressive golden tea ceremony room, and numerous other amazing architectural and design element. Immerse yourself in the world of chaya culture.

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